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-- there are promises in election campaigns that some taxes might be lightened a little bit. but on the whole, italy has no skill for a fiscal expansion. so at the moment, they're going to have to button down, keep spending heightened and keep things right. >> do you think italy is in a better position? >> in the short-term, spain has a more stable government. that's becoming unpopular, but at the moment, there's no threat to the majority of the popular party in spain. >> italy, we have an election coming up and anything could happen. we have a lot of strange things going on. there is a party which is looking like it will get around 15 cents a vote run by a former comedian. there's no clear political agenda, as well. there is a lot of political instability, but i think the long-term economic picture is in less trouble because it has much lower overall debt limits than spain combined. >> and how times have changed on that front. thanks very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >>> growing market optimism fueled by a string of upbeat earnings has put equity markets on stronger footing. but u.s.
. so more invasionive in terms of taxes, which clearly is happening. and less alienled on whgned on about it. should government tax harder or should spending be cut harder? not only is there no agreement, but the democrats now are saying, listen, forget the debt ceiling. let's get rid of that silly little thing. but do we actually need a budget? >> so we're learning that we may finally get a budget for the first time in what, three years? significant, though, because these are just templates. >> i great, they are templates. but letting go at a time when the debt is compounding is worrying. however, having said that, you can get worried about that as a market participant, but as long as the federal reserve has open ended quantitative easing, nothing is going to happen from the long end. >> from a market point of view, we were talking about allen capper about this last hour. but from a market point of view, the best outcome is something that lowers the long-term debt outcome. but we keep get ago worsening of the long-term debt profile and a hit to the near term. that is a mix that
reforms, they're talking about tax reforms, as well. this will be a multi layered process and hopefully they'll be in power long enough to deliver some of those changes. i think the market was expecting for the bank of japan to come in .deliver everything that was going to solve all of japan's problems after decades of recession, then they were probably misguided. but for the moment, the reaction we're getting from people who were watching japan is they probably took as many steps as they could today to try and address this decision. >> kaori, stay with us. ed, welcome. you just heard a little bit of the back and forth. what's your own opinion here on what the boj has or hasn't delivered? >> good morning. thanks very much for having me on the show. my opinion is i completely agree with everything kaori said. even more than that, i would say to the viewing audience, look, this is the cramer moment for japan where you bring out the bells and the whistles and you toot the horn and you tweet and you pound the table and you run around the room saying buy, buy, buy. the framework is now in pl
of opportunities. but both of those are outside the u.s. so we're assuming that the tax laws are not going to change. we're basically going to put our money to work in places like canada, the uk, israel, russia and asia where they're going to get a return and where we want it. >> that is a change and that starts spreading out, does that mean the rate of pick up in dividend payments and shares -- >> no, we committed to our shareholders 50% of our cash flow we will pay back on them, either in the form of dividends or share buybacks. but i think the key things to take away from davos is we're becoming the innovative leader and many of the concepts appear to be paying out very well for us. >> so what makes more sense for you right now, dividends, increase or a buyback? >> we're going to poll our shareholders. we've committed to giving you 50% back. >> thank you for join onning the program. >> we so appreciate it. >> thank you. now, look, we were going to talk about this but while we've got maria here, derek jeter, right? >> yes. he came to see me at dinner last night. i was talking about when
that it's gaining more traction, right? >> it is. and you've got a financial tax being talked about in the u.k. >> yes. >> all sorts of different pressures on the -- in the -- facing banks now. and this is certainly not going to away any time soon. >> who's going to join us? >> right now we're going to talk to david rubenstein, the carlisle group. we'll talk about private equity. private equity has also been under attack in some ways. what i would like to know from david rubenstein is how they're allocating capital now. >> yeah. >> how do you make money in this environment, and is private equity expecting the kind of regulation that the big banks are going to face? >> and bmp -- >> yeah, coe. >> will join us. plenty more to come here in davos. kelly, meanwhile, we'll hand it back to you. we'll continue wheile hand it back to you. >>> we'll look at markets. futures gearing up for the trading session. a couple of fascinating stats, the down for three straight trading days, eight out of the last nine. five straight for the s&p 500. five-year highs for this index. we look at futures thi
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5